Patricia
RECENT ANSWERS
/ Asked by Angela B.
It's best to be transparent with an employer from the beginning, especially if your course schedule can impact your work schedule. Make sure to share your story behind why you're pursuing a PhD and how it will add to you being an asset to the company. Best of luck pursuing your PhD and part-time emp...

/ Asked by Kelcie H.
A common mistake is being unprepared. Do your research on an organization before you interview. Remember that you're interviewing a company just as much as they are interviewing you. Ask questions that will provide you with more insight into the organization. Questions regarding benefits and compens...

/ Asked by Emily P.
Hi there! If you haven't done so already, create a LinkedIn profile. Keep it updated and connect with folks that are in the industry you wish to join. LinkedIn is a professional platform and is used by several employers to source potential candidates. Network, Network, NETWORK! Good Luck in your job...

/ Asked by Tiffany Y.
Interviewing is always a stressful experience, no matter how good of a communicator you are. I recommend using a "cheat-sheet" during your interview to help you remember your speaking points. Write down a few notes that will help you remember your accomplishments or any other touching points you'd l...

/ Asked by Collin B.
Unless requested, cover letters are not necessary when applying for a job. For the most part cover letters are overlooked as recruiters focus on what is on a resume. If you would still like to provide a cover letter I suggest making it unique so it captures the eye of a recruiter and hiring manager....

/ Asked by Jill H.
Great question! Before restructuring your search you might want to re-review your resume. Your skill set and experience may not be clearly explained in your resume, which may be the reason you're not being called for interviews. Ask a friend, co-worker, mentor, previous professor, etc. to review you...

/ Asked by Nirmal G.
This is a great question and your response can tell an employer a lot about yourself. By asking this question an employer wants to learn more about your ambitions and how you plan on accomplishing them. Keep in mind that this will also provide an employer with insight on how long you intend to be wi...

/ Asked by danielle o.
Good question! Generally references aren't truly needed until an employer has requested them. I would utilize the extra space for listing more experience or skills you may have.

/ Asked by David V.
That is a great question! Join as many Business Resource Groups your employer may have to offer. Not only will it be a great opportunity for professional development, it will also be a great opportunity to network and meet new people outside your department. I also suggest sending out calendar invit...

/ Asked by Susan S.
Great question! Public speaking is one way to promote your personal brand.

Practice your presentation with a peer and be open to their feedback. Be sure your material doesn't stray from the topic and is relatable to your audience. Be confident and know your material, you never know who you'll impress
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/ Asked by Tanya L.
This is a great question! Avoid providing personal information such as your marital status, date of birth, social security number, etc.
Also, keep in mind that a resume is a professional document therefore you should update your email address if it comes across unprofessional (ex. prettygirl2001@emai...

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