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/ Asked by Daniela C.
Specific to types of industries/types of companies, management consulting or similar where one solves problems/advises client are likely to use case interviews.  But they could be used in almost any company or industry.  Case interviews have two primary purposes:  1)Helps to give the ...

/ Asked by Angela B.
Employers in the U.S. are allowed to ask under certain conditions which are generally governed by the federal civil rights act of 1964 and subsequent rulings.  In simplest terms, specific to employment, the act says that employers can't discriminate based on one's race/ethnicity, color, re...

/ Asked by Amel A.
My personal opinion is that it is always better to get some work experience before pursuing your MBA.  Your MBA coursework will likely be easier and more enriching if you are able to apply actual work experience to it and most employers will contribute to the cost of your MBA, some will pay for...

/ Asked by Amanda L.
There's no standard, as you suggest, good writing can take many forms.  Best thing to do is ask if the employer has a preference.  If they don't, don't necessarily provide what you think might be your 'best' writing...if your best writing sample is a creative piece and you are being consid...

/ Asked by Kelcie H.
Generally, I would say you will progress faster by transferring between many different firms.  Many employers have not yet figured out how to best move and promote talent internally, despite their best intentions.  Of course, there are exceptions and they will often be companies highly ran...

/ Asked by Kelcie H.
Top 3 in no particular order:

1.  Not being prepared - do your research on the position, on the company, the industry, etc.
2.  Coming off as arrogant vs. confident - be confident, but also humble and show you are eager to learn new things
3.  Not being yourself - don't try to be what yo


...

/ Asked by Jonathan L.
You've been with your company for 3 years now and 1 year in your current role, that is a more than fair commitment, now is the right time to explore externally.  Remember, you're just exploring, if you find something better, go for it.  If not, continue to keep an eye out externally, but a...

/ Asked by Tommy P.
No, there is little to no benefit in doing so and if an employer is interested in your references, they will specifically ask for them as part of the application or later in the process.  On a more subtle note, if you do put them on your resume, they become prospects for a savvy recruiter...the...

/ Asked by J.M. S.
Why do you want him to go to a four year college?  Pursuing the community college route and starting a career earlier, may be the best thing for him.  He can always go back and get the four year degree later as it makes sense.  Certainly education is an important factor in our selecti...

/ Asked by Jorge M.
I would say many employers are "interested in the person rather than the perfect match on paper" as you say it.  Essentially we describe that as hiring for potential vs. past experience.  More often than not, employers need to do both.  Rarely is a perfect match on paper, the perfect ...

/ Asked by Tanya L.
Best option is to ask about time off policies before taking the job.  If your potential employer is not willing to share that information before you commit, you should seriously question whether or not to take the job.  Assuming you are already on the job, there really is no standard for t...

/ Asked by Tanya L.
Many states and municipalities are now banning employers from asking about salary history and using it to determine your starting point in new role.  While there are other reasons, the biggest driver for this is because basing job offers on past salary history continues to perpetuate wage dispa...

/ Asked by Nathalie N.
I echo my fellow hiring expert, you can't have too many internships.  Most employers will find your internship experience and your waitressing experience much more valuable than what you are learning in the classroom.

/ Asked by Rylan V.
I would suggest looking at some of the larger "job aggregators" such as Indeed.com, Simplyhired.com, Glassdoor.com, and LinkedIn.com.  Even Careerbuilder.com and Monster.com are possibilities, though they are not nearly as popular as they once were.  A niche engineering site I am aware of ...

/ Asked by Robert C.
I am not aware of any way to search for this specifically, the screening process you describe is rarely put in a job description, so you don't have anything to search for.  I'm sure there are more opportunities than this, but from my experience, I've found that jobs in the public sector (federa...

/ Asked by Cynthia p.
I appreciate your approach in seeking something that you will enjoy as well as offers a good income for you.  I run into people far too often who don't really enjoy what they are doing but hang on simply for the paycheck.  A few suggestions on how you should determine what to study:  ...

/ Asked by Abby P.
In general, experience is more important than a degree.  Of course, if you are in college right now, your work experience will be limited, so the degree is more important at this stage in your career, much less so later on.  Having said that, more often than not, the fact that you have a d...

/ Asked by Kaylie D.
I would tend to say the GPA because how would I know how rigorous your class schedule was?  Your question assumes that the employer knows more than they likely do about your chosen major and associated curriculum.  What is generally more important to employers is what you've done outside o...

/ Asked by Kaylie D.
For sure, both are valued more than your "in class" experience.  Most employers will be more interested in what you did outside of the classroom vs. in it.  We want to know how you have applied what you are learning / have learned and there are things that simply can't be le...

/ Asked by Emma R.
As you suggest, it varies, but more often than not, I would recommend obtaining work experience first for three primary reasons.  1)  Actual work experience is more valuable to an employer...it's not about the education itself, more about how you've applied what you've learned.  ...

/ Asked by Melissa N.
As Phil from Merck suggested, simply include your decision to stay home with family on your resume/appication, you should also inlcude the part about your department being eliminated.  You can even write it up as your current job, if your last job is showing up as ended in 2015, that raises a r...

/ Asked by Vaish R.
Not sure from your question if you are currently an intern or seeking an internship.  If you are seeking an internship in Supply Chain, the technical/behavioral skills you reference are not as relevant.  The degree you are pursuing, the coursework you are focused on and any experiential wo...

/ Asked by Noah A.
There is nothing wrong with going back to the same office, but I would recommend choosing to work in a different office for the 2nd summer for the reasons you state and more.  Change is more constant than ever in today's world, the greater variety of experiences you obtain, the more prepared yo...

/ Asked by Noah A.
Absolutely, internships are a great opportunity for you to gain experiences and try things you may not be inclined to if it was a full-time job.  A diversity of experiences are more welcome than ever in the public or private sectors, a ton of research that backs up more variety/diversity/unique...

/ Asked by Matthew M.
First of all, congrats on your career growth to date!  While it's not the norm as you suggest, it is a great story that future employers will want to hear from you.  The key word in my previous statement, is "hear."  Just stick to the facts on your resume...document your promotions an...

/ Asked by maureen f.
Yes, include your athletic experience and any other "non-classroom" school-related activities you may have participated in as well.  Volunteer information is also great to add, any experience you have that an employer can translate into/assess against skills that are required for a job or a car...

/ Asked by Phillip W.
As long as you continue to learn on the job and/or in the classroom, I wouldn't limit yourself to any potential career path in HR, their are likely more career paths that would be realistic vs. not.  Since your recruitment role will touch many other areas of HR (benefits, compensation, emp...

/ Asked by Gennadii O.
Unfortunately, there is no simple way to do this.  You may get a clue from some company career sites or some language in their job descriptions, but companies have no obligation to "advertise" so to speak that they will assist with citizenship/green card.  Suggest you focus on looking at c...

/ Asked by Clark D.
Your extracurricular/volunteer activities are work experience.  What you learned and accomplished through them is just as relevant as anything you might learn "on the job."  For example, when I ask a candidate for examples of their time management skills or teamworking skills and so on, an...

/ Asked by Carol M.
I echo the other experts comments and would like to reinforce one point.  If asked, honesty in the best policy, but if it is not required on an application to provide the information, it is best not to provide it.  Most recruiters are looking for the fastest, easiest way to get to the...

/ Asked by James E.
Strongly echo the comments of my fellow expert from AT&T, cybersecurity, information security, etc. would be an excellent career to consider.  It will only continue to grow and is applicable to every industry/company in some way.

/ Asked by Harsha K.
Echo the suggestion made by the expert at AT&T.  On the surface, your skill set would seem very desirable, so make sure your resume is tailored to the jobs you are applying for and make sure you are not assuming too much with regards to the content of your resume.  For e...

/ Asked by David V.
I would suggest for most jobs and professions at this point, a traditional resume will do, but having the website can be a differentiator for you, which is critical to anyone's job search...how do you stand out from the pack?  Additionally, in certain professions, like design/creative, you esse...

/ Asked by Jonathan L.
Go for it!  Even if it turns out not to be directly applicable, the global experience you gain should more than make up for that.  Like many global employers, we highly value, but often struggle to find candidates with "boots on the ground" global experience, it will be a great asset ...

/ Asked by Nandini K.
I think you need to start thinking about your career path differently than you seem to be right now.  Your career path should be unique to you, there is no my career path is supposed to be this or that.  If you are not sure of the specific field or role that you want to pursue following gr...

/ Asked by Michael G.
Hello,
Sorry to read about your challenges here.  Your experience is not uncommon, but I can also share with you that there are many employers who don't have such requirements.  I've been with several employers in my career and know of many others where members of the most senior leadersh...

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