Eddie
Versatile talent acquisition professional with experience in auto collision, education, healthcare, retail, and sales. Proficient in applicant tracking systems and skilled at sourcing and attracting passive candidates. Strategic Leadership master's program student, avid speaker, public speaking coach, personal branding enthusiast, blogger, podcaster, and HBCU/Divine Nine advocate.
RECENT ANSWERS
/ Asked by Daniela C.
You are likely to run into case interviews in consulting roles or roles that have a heavy consulting element such as project management or business development, regardless of the industry. In fact, one of our hiring managers recently used a case interview for a high-level customer service role.

For t
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/ Asked by Angela B.
If you're referring to the question that appears on the average job application, it's normally for a couple of reasons. One, many employers want to increase the diversity in their organization to drive innovation, make the business more dynamic and/or to serve a diverse customer base more effectivel...

/ Asked by Amel A.
You will get varying views on this one. Some will say it doesn't matter because employers just want to know if you can do the work. Others, like yours truly, would see a high value in your having completed an accelerated program. It shows you have drive and a lot of intellectual energy. Those are tw...

/ Asked by J.M. S.
A Greek life question! Be still my beating heart! I'm a former college chapter president of my fraternity, a former National Interfraternity Council rep, and still active on the alumni level. I always tell college Greeks that including a fraternity/sorority on a resume makes sense if you a...

/ Asked by Rae H.
I believe the director was genuine. As a recruiter, I get excited when I come across great talent. So, I keep those resumes close for upcoming opportunities.

In fact, we recently hired a candidate who has been trying for roles almost a year. Months ago, I urged her to keep trying. When I saw an oppo
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/ Asked by Timothy C.
I don't know how you feel about sales, but I was once told that educators make great sales reps. That is the case because educators are patient and instruct people naturally. I've also seen former educators transition pretty well into management positions, human resources, government policy work, an...

/ Asked by Tanya L.
Great question. When looking for candidates, we often use keywords. It helps us zero in on the people with the skills and experience we need when searching job boards, social media (especially LinkedIn), or using a search engine. The solution for the job seeker is to strategically place keyword...

/ Asked by jared b.
Kudos to you, because it seems as if you're in a tough situation but you're not quitting. Don't think of working minimum wage jobs as holding you back from a future. While you have been understandably frustrated, the flip side is having a job gives you an opportunity to continue to build valuable sk...

/ Asked by Erica I.
Hi there! As a fellow mass comm degree recipient, let me start by telling you that your story is not unique. The first thing I would suggest is to get away from the word "can't." Mass comm is an extremely competitive field so perspective and motivation are very important for success. The second thin...

/ Asked by David V.
I know you're in winter break now and I hope the networking is going well. Remember this. ALWAYS make time for networking! Other ways you should consider networking is by attending conferences connected to your major or student organization(s) (if applicable). Also, join social media groups connecte...

/ Asked by Catherine D.
I am a big fan of personality tests! They do have significance in the workplace because of what they tell you about your identity and value. Employers build teams based on what they experience from team members, first-hand. Honestly, some are more intentional than others about how they build teams. ...

/ Asked by Abby P.
Any violation of policies or anything that disrupts productivity can be grounds for termination. Being consistently late for work comes to mind immediately because time is money to any organization and the organization depends on every team member to do their part maintain productivity. Also, showin...

/ Asked by Kaylie D.
Aaaaah, the "perfect candidate." Where is that person? LOL By "perfect candidate," I hope you mean the candidate who fits that employer's specific environment. ;-)

But here are people skills that are valuable in just about every work environment:
  • Communication,
  • Problem solving (especially if you


...

/ Asked by Kaylie D.
This really depends on the field. For professional fields such as medicine, science and law, the answer is YES. For a lot of other fields, it may not matter as much. For example, I have recruited project managers with degrees in mass communication, psychology, and even science in some cases. In that...

/ Asked by Emma R.
For the job market, it doesn't hurt to start immediately even if you're a freshman. While you may not be looking for a job at that time, you can at least get an idea of what the expectations are by studying job postings. Regardless of your major, however, make plans to intern somewhere. An internshi...

/ Asked by Emma R.
This depends on what you want to do with the degree, in my opinion. I'm actually just entering a master's degree program after graduating from college over 20 years ago--yes OVER 20! The reason is I took time to figure out what really stimulates me intellectually instead of finding something that wo...

/ Asked by Hayley R.
First, I think master's degrees are becoming more essential based on the field. Also, a wealth of experience with some advancement in the same field can make up for not having a master's degree. To answer your question, I think master's degrees are becoming more essential because companies and organ...

/ Asked by Hayley R.
You are not alone! Many students are having the same experience and I recall friends of mine having the same experiences in college. Try to identify transferable skills. For example, organization and communication are skills that transfer easily among different fields. Without knowing your major and...

/ Asked by Katherine M.
A great way to do this is to volunteer for a non-profit. As a non-profit board chair, I can tell you that I would LOVE to have someone come in and volunteer with an essential duty such as marketing or accounting! If that volunteer does a great job, I would not hesitate to write them a nice reference...

/ Asked by Abbi S.
This is such a good question. The answer is RESULTS! For a recent grad, I would look for an indicator such as increasing productivity in a student organization. For instance, if I knew then what I know now, I would have included the percentage increase of membership in my college fraternity chapter ...

/ Asked by Reed M.
1. I love this question! There are three basic skills that a majority of employers find valuable from any candidate:  communication, organization, and team work. I've worked with over 200 hiring managers in various industries and those three always come up. It's not really different for an inte...

/ Asked by Trenton B.
Hi there! For starters, English is a great major if you want to write; you can also consider Mass Communication (my degree) which would give you access to a mix of English, journalism and writing classes. If your focus is to be a reporter, that's a bit different. Your job is to write about what you ...

/ Asked by Emily P.
Let me assure you that you are definitely not alone on this. There are many like you who don't see eye-to-eye with their bosses. First, concentrate on your job. Be productive and meet your expectations. Nothing is more important than that. One mistake I made early in my career was letting my pr...

/ Asked by maureen f.
First, let me say that I am proud of you for even thinking that way! YES, put captain of the baseball team on your resume for that reason. Be prepared to tell a story that demonstrates your leadership and communication skills as part of the job interview.

And, YES, include volunteer information. Whe
...

/ Asked by Jay G.
Relax! If you can't recall the email, it's okay. Just breathe. It looks like you write well, so I'm thinking that you have established a reputation as a good writer with him, as well. You can send a quick follow-up email apologizing for the error (just to let him know that you take pride in your pre...

/ Asked by Maura W.
I treat LinkedIn like networking in person. It's about courtesy and making your intentions known. Let your mutual connection(s) know that you are interested in an introduction. When I send a connection request to someone I don't know, I ALWAYS let that person know why I want to connect. By the way, ...

/ Asked by Angela B.
Hi! 

YES, it is OK. In fact, it shows initiative which is an attribute admired by many hiring managers. If there is nothing available, there is a chance that a hiring manager or recruiter would be impressed enough to pass your resume on to a colleague who could use your skills and knowledge. Bei
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/ Asked by PRANJALI R.
Welp, here's advice from a former radio personality. First, let me give you brutal truth about radio. It's fun work but the trade-off is that decent pay can be very hard to come by. The great thing is that you could double as an engineer and air personality at a station. Yes, that can really be done...

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