Phil
I am a strategy-driven recruiting professional currently leading Future Talent pipelining via internships and cooperative assignments for a global Fortune 500 company. I connect aspiring pharmaceutical research students to incredible opportunities within Merck's Research Laboratory at locations across the United States.
RECENT ANSWERS
/ Asked by Erica M.
Hi there! One way that I've found helpful for myself has been using the header "Relevant Work Experience" for roles that tie in directly to careers and jobs that I am applying for. Then I use the header "Other Work Experience" for other roles that might be similar or have provided me with useful exp...

/ Asked by Melanie W.
That's a great question. I wouldn't fill it up with ALL of your work - i would choose maybe 5-8 pieces of work that you feel best exemplifies your skills and different types of work and focus on those. As a recruiter, I'd be more inclined to see a smaller volume of portfolio items that speak strongl...

/ Asked by Melanie W.
Hi there - I am not a legal expert by any means, but I believe that all states with recreational marijuana laws have exemptions for for workplace drug policies. I'm not sure which state you live in, but most employers in most states can still deny your employment if there is marijuana in the system,...

/ Asked by J.M. S.
Hi there - great question! I don't really think there is a "best" time to start doing internships. Most companies are looking for students who have completed a certain set of courses or a specific number of years of school, so read the internship descriptions carefully. If you meet the minimum quali...

/ Asked by Jorge M.
Hi there - great question! My advice is to apply for positions where you meet the basic qualifications - these are typically listed in the job description. This is by far the most important thing that you can do to increase your chances of moving through the process and getting an interview. These r...

/ Asked by Tanya L.
Hi there - there are lots of tools out there to help you research salary ahead of a potential interview. My two favorites are PayScale.com and Glassdoor. One thing to keep in mind is that salary is dependent on your level of experience as well as geographic area / cost of living, so make sure to con...

/ Asked by Tanya L.
If I were to pick five top attributes, they would be 1) readability; 2) education / major; 3) extracurricular activities; 4) research or relevant experience; 5) spelling and grammar. 

1) Readability - most recruiters look through resumes really quickly. If I can't easily find what I need to see
...

/ Asked by Emily P.
Hi there - I would agree and rather than "ask for a job", treat this as more of a networking opportunity. Reach out to some folks at the company you're looking at, especially those within the field you're trying to enter. Professional conferences are often a great way to meet with and network with p...

/ Asked by Santiago W.
This could be a great question for your college / university Career Services office. Most universities would require you to obtain a PhD or a doctorate degree in the field that you would like to teach, especially if you would like to get a position on a tenure track. A lot of colleges also have some...

/ Asked by Maggie S.
I would recommend going into the discussion as prepared as possible - be ready with numbers for folks that are in positions similar to yours in your area with comparable levels of experience. Be able to show your worth and value to the company - did you lead any cost-savings projects? Were you part ...

/ Asked by Maggie S.
Great question. In my experience, employers are looking for a brief, high level description of your role, contributions and successes. Be sure to use universal language versus present company acronyms for clarity. Also, your profile is an opportunity to highlight your interests and career goals. Use...

/ Asked by Maggie S.
One of my biggest pieces of advice is to get involved with any professional organizations or societies that are related to your major or field of study. Many of those organizations are international, and can offer virtual networking sessions or opportunities for committee involvement or leadership. ...

/ Asked by Kristen C.
This is a question that I commonly ask during interviews as well - now that you know it's coming, you can be prepared next time! What I'm really trying to learn from this question is how candidates navigate and work through difficult situations or difficult people. I don't really think there is one ...

/ Asked by Kristen C.
Great question. For me, a candidate really stands out when he/she knows what it is that my company does and is at least fluent in either current events and news within the industry or news about the company specifically. It really shows me that you've done your research and care enough about this ro...

/ Asked by Madison T.
Hi there - yes, internships can be extremely vital when you're searching for a full-time role after graduation. It IS possible to hold an internship while working on several other things - it really comes down to prioritization. You may need to take a step back from some clubs or organizations durin...

/ Asked by Thalira C.
Hi there - think about any opportunities that you've had to gain transferable skills. Did you have any informal summer work? Have you had opportunities for leadership within any clubs or organizations? Were you part of any athletic teams? Thinking about situations where you've been able to develop s...

/ Asked by Robert S.
Hi there. You need to make sure that you are being thoughtful and strategic about what you include on your resume, as it really is the first opportunity that employers have to get to know you. I would definitely include involvement in professional organizations or societies that relate directly to y...

/ Asked by Karah K.
Hi there - what you wear on an interview is absolutely important to the interview process. It shows that you take the interview seriously, that you have a sense of professionalism, and create a positive first impression. These impressions are formed very quickly based on what you're wearing and how ...

/ Asked by Krysten B.
Hello - I don't know if study abroad experiences are generally valued "more" than internships and other types of hands-on experiences, but from an employer perspective, those types of immersive opportunities provide different kinds of experiences that I value. For example, studying in a foreign coun...

/ Asked by KelliMae S.
I think that they can be in order to show that you're a well-rounded candidate. It's important, though, not to think about getting involved in a plethora of activities just for the sake of doing "something" - employers are much more interested in leadership-type roles, or activities that you are tru...

/ Asked by Katherine M.
For me, one of the best things that a candidate can do in an interview is to answer the interviewer's questions clearly, concisely, and by providing solid examples. I am always impressed when a candidate can connect my question to previous experiences and provide tangible numbers, data, or outcomes ...

/ Asked by Abbi S.
Hi there - I don't know that there is necessarily a "formula" or a set number in terms of from whom you can ask for a reference. In my mind, the biggest things are to make sure that whomever you ask is aware of the request and aware of the role(s) that you are using them as a reference for, and choo...

/ Asked by Melissa N.
Hi there - I've seen this come through in several resumes at different points in my career. As a recruiter, I would add a short bullet to your resume explaining that you took time away from work to care for family. That is a fairly straightforward way to explain any gaps in your employment history t...

/ Asked by Noah A.
I think it really depends on what your career goals and ambitions look like. In general, it certainly can't hurt. If you're interested in future jobs with governmental agencies, showing that you've been able to go through the clearance process would certainly be helpful. Whether or not it's worth me...

/ Asked by Emily S.
I agree with my colleague from Eaton. I think it really depends on the type of move you're planning to make and your career goals. Relationships are everything when it comes to seeking a full-time role after graduation: if you've interned at a great company and want to stay there, by all means, go b...

/ Asked by Madeline P.
Good morning! I don't think that there are any types of organizations to "avoid" - when I review resumes and profiles, I look less at the individual organizations and activities and focus more on what students have gotten out of those activities. I suggest to students that rather than become superfi...

/ Asked by Taylor C.
Congratulations on your senior year! I think timing really varies across the board - at my company, we start recruiting May graduates in September and run through April. A lot of companies tend to recruit heavily on-campus in both the fall and the spring, so I would begin preparing your resume and y...

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