Stephanie
RECENT ANSWERS
/ Asked by Amanda W.
I always like to take stock of the who, what, when, where, why of an issue.  That seems like a pretty sound method to use in this case too.  Who is the person you want to mention, but didn't choose as a reference?  What was the reason they left the company?  When did they leave?&...

/ Asked by Maura W.
Well now, that's just a question for Emily Post (manners maven, look it up if you're interested in all things etiquette).  During the hiring process, it is appropriate to use Mr./Ms. when speaking to someone more senior.  The time tested phrase of...Mr. So and so, may I call you John? ...

/ Asked by Adriana M.
Hello!  I agree with the previous posters, but wanted to add one more piece of information.  If you haven't already, I encourage you to build your person brand on LinkedIn and other easily utilized social channels.  You can ask that your references speak to your skills and their exper...

/ Asked by Angela B.
Though I agree with the previous poster that transparency is best, make sure when you bring it up the context is relevant.  Manage the narrative on it...you are pursuing an advanced degree because you have drive and initiative.  You have a thirst for knowledge that you bring to all your en...

/ Asked by Amel A.
Great question! The age old question of what matters most…experience or education? I can tell you from personal experience that going back to college full time after you start making money is a tough decision! If you are planning to pursue an MBA while working full-time, prepare your friends ...

/ Asked by Amel A.
Typically a job description will reference expectations in that area.  If a company is looking specifically for a 4 year accredited University Bachelors or Masters, they are probably going to be that specific.  If they are just looking for a completed degree, then you will be listing year ...

/ Asked by Joel C.
Hi there!  Congratulations on getting your associates degree.  Education of all kinds is valuable and will help you in pursuit of your future.  When you get a general studies degree you have a lot of options.  What I would suggest is to get serious about making lists of organizat...

/ Asked by Tommy P.
Woo hoo for follow up!  Definitely do it, definitely don't over do it.  A thank you note should happen the next day if you're going to do one, the follow up should be driven by the schedule your interviewer gives you when you ask them when they are planning to move forward.  Ask the q...

/ Asked by Nicholas M.
You are not alone! Interviews are everything from exciting all the way to spine chilling for everyone, even the most experienced interviewee.  The very best things you can do are research, be prepared and practice.  Connect with people in your industry of interest to see if you can gather ...

/ Asked by Nathalie N.
You are smart to put so much effort into your future!  An internship can be the perfect foot in the door a great company.  Typically if an offer is made to you, the recruiter or hiring manager delivering the offer will also give you a timeline for your response.  If they don't, be pre...

/ Asked by Roh P.
Hi there!  I would consider your LinkedIn profile (and for that matter all your public social properties) to be part of your personal brand.  What does that information say about you to a potential employer?  What you have described above suggests you are an active member of LinkedIn ...

/ Asked by Tanya L.
Hi there - you are smart to think about what your resume is saying to a potential future employer.  Of course keyword searches are one of the things a savvy recruiter is going to use when sourcing talented individuals to fill their job openings.  Use the job description as a road map in de...

/ Asked by Tanya L.
Resumes don’t have to be complicated, but they do need to clearly convey who you are and what you can do. Most recruiters are looking for some pretty basic info that helps determine whether you’re a great fit for the role and the culture of their company, so when you’re looking for...

/ Asked by Tanya L.
Ah yes, the thank you note.  Well, do you want to separate yourself from the pack?  Do you think people appreciate gratitude? Do you want to remind a recruiter or hiring manager why you are the best person for the job?  Those all seem like legit reasons to write a quick thank you note...

/ Asked by Tanya L.
That is a tough question and a tougher situation.  We have all had a boss that left us with a bad impression, but that experience doesn't need to carry over into our next job. 

I have found in my career that I never know who knows one another. With the power of networking being such a stro
...

/ Asked by Tanya L.
Being fired is always a drag, whether you loved or hated the job, whether you knew or didn't know it was coming.  I would definitely recommend talking through the scenario of your firing with someone you trust.  Find the narrative that gives you a chance to be honest about the experience w...

/ Asked by Tanya L.
Great question!

And here's the thing...why is your interviewer asking?  I have found one of the best ways to answer questions I don't feel compelled to answer is with a smile and this question back...."Why do you want to know?"  I have also had success navigating questions by changing the s
...

/ Asked by Tanya L.
Hi there!  I'm sure your parents are very excited for you to get a job!

Here's the thing though, they are not going to go to that interview with you, they are not coming to work with you, they aren't the one's that did the work that made you someone to consider for the job. 

I am honestly n


...

/ Asked by Tanya L.
We like to give the perspective from a few of our recruiters when we can!

From Recruiter Bryan:
Do a quick search in your favorite search engine and you’ll turn up more than enough examples of what to avoid in an interview - from answering your cell phone to dressing inappropriately, and even gi

...

/ Asked by Tenisha P.
While it’s impossible to speak to another company's hiring practices, it sounds like you’re still in the running. There are a number of reasons for a delay, and most of the time they are nothing within your control. It could be that they’re continuing to interview candidates or may...

/ Asked by Krystin G.
HI there!  Great question and one that is definitely on the minds of lots of job seekers.  Most jobs have underlining core skills: customer service, teamwork, project management, communication, etc.. Review the new job requirements and skills/competencies. Then map the finding back to your...

/ Asked by Onohije P.
Hi there!  With only completing one semester it is totally not necessary to list it on your applications/resume. I would, however, focus on your skills, highlighting special projects you’ve worked on, critical skills you’ve gained in a position, etc. 

Now take a second and thin
...

/ Asked by Rebecca B.
Great question! Objective statements should be customized to the company and position you are applying for. You don’t have to totally rewrite your statement every time, but make sure you are clear on what it is you are looking for in your career.

Inspire the reader of our resume to want to keep
...

/ Asked by Tanya L.
Your age at graduation is absolutely not relevant so no need for you to worry about addressing this as an issue. You can, if you feel comfortable, bring up your service if you feel you have gained any job-related knowledge and/or skills that might make you more marketable for the job you are applyin...

/ Asked by Sean W.
Congrats on graduation!  I hope you are feeling proud of your accomplishment.

Are you networking? Applying and cold calling can be totally adequate pathways to your dream job, but knowing someone who can put your resume a the top of the pile can make all the difference.  I know it isn't al
...

/ Asked by David V.
Take a breather, relax, let yourself have a real break.  When you feel good and like you are ready to pound the proverbial pavement, talk to the people you encounter about what you'd like to be doing.  Use this time to research job descriptions of the positions you are interested in, see w...

/ Asked by David V.
Wow!  Now that is a fully loaded question.  So I'm going to go with a yes, with a caveat.  Obviously people have to know who you are to want to hire you, work with you, invite you onto a project, and introduce you to people they know.  All necessary things to get a job and make t...

/ Asked by Maggie S.
Hi there - as a woman who has faced that very thing, I can tell you the best conversation I ever had about why I deserved a raise happened when I went in prepared to speak to my work, my experience, my expertise and unique skill set and finally what was competitive in the market place. 

I said
...

/ Asked by Maggie S.
In my opinion some of the most effective leadership qualities include honesty, trust, clear communication, great listening skills and respect. In my experience I have found teams and organizations to function much more effectively when their leader is open and honest and has the ability to share inf...

/ Asked by Maggie S.
We're looking for you to make it straight forward to see you're awesome!  Feel free to editorialize yourself in the summary, but at the end of the day it should be clear, concise, to the point and include all the info that makes you hireable in the position you are seeking.

/ Asked by Maggie S.
Studying or living abroad is something many people would love to pursue, and you’re smart to start growing your network now to make that goal a reality. For starters, tap your local network and do a quick search for local groups that match your interests. You’re bound to find at least a ...

/ Asked by Kristen C.
Employers can certainly ask some interesting questions. If you do a quick internet search you’ll see questions like this are part of a widely-used technique called Behavioral Interviewing. The basic idea is to ask questions about how you’ve performed in the past so a potential employer h...

/ Asked by Kristen C.
Good question!  If you don't have any other leadership experience and that is something I'm looking for, then you better believe you want to include it!  Is it the first thing I'm looking for, probably not.  I want to see your internships/GPA/experience etc. just like everyone else.&n...

/ Asked by Kristen C.
First of all you need to be good at what you do and do it well. Make sure you clearly understand the goals and objectives and what you need to accomplish at work so you can meet those goals. Someone who doesn’t get work done as expected won’t stand out, at least not for the right reasons...

/ Asked by Kristen C.
There are numerous pros and cons for going to graduate school right after you graduate college. These pros and cons can only be reviewed then decided by you. I recommend researching the industry or type of job you would like to have. Do most people in this field have a grad degree? Is it required or...

/ Asked by Andrew H.
How badly do you want this particular job?  If it is your dream job, you are in a really small industry or you just out right want it, then wait it out.  Continue to follow up, expressing your continued interest, sharing that you are willing to wait and do what it takes to make it happen.&...

/ Asked by Samantha P.
Welcome to the PNW! Seattle is awesome.  As a previous poster noted, you can certainly leave your address of your resume, but it will likely be on an online application, so it is probably not completely an option to go address-less.  Networking is critical for you so the right people know ...

/ Asked by Justine G.
Well that's the question for the ages!  We are all looking for it and a lucky few find it.  I think finding your passion is all about figuring out what excites you, what captures your interest, what keeps you up at night thinking about it with joy and enthusiasm.  It is about trying e...

/ Asked by Jonathan L.
Hi there!  When I read your question, the first thing I notice is that you have options!  This is a great position to be in, so right off the bat, congrats on doing good work that is being recognized by your company. 

You mention that you are ready to come home.  Only you can dec
...

/ Asked by Jonathan L.
Hi there!  You can speak to hypothetical examples of how you handle different types of ethical decisions and situations.  No need to go into specifics.  If they are really just trying to dig into your character and decision making process then you can demonstrate that without throwing...

/ Asked by LaShaina W.
Hi there!  You have received some great information from previous responders, but I wanted to add a little extra info around networking.  You are going to find that there are different titles used for the same jobs all over the industry.  It can make it a challenge to narrow your sear...

/ Asked by Rianne Z.
That is a great question! There are many different jobs that ask for a writing sample, even if writing may not be a key component of the job.  What does the employer want to know about you?  They want to know if you can organize your thoughts into a cohesive narrative, do you use appropria...

/ Asked by Angela B.
Hi there!  You are definitely not the first person who has felt this way about networking and putting yourself out there as a job seeker.  I have heard a similar lament from people who don't think they are shy, they just don't want to rely on someone else to take their career to the next l...

/ Asked by Angela B.
You'll never know unless you try!  In this ever changing workforce, if you have unique skills that are needed by the company you are applying to, they are looking for you!  Whether or not different companies pay for travel for interviews, relocation or any other costs is going to be differ...

/ Asked by Kelsey C.
Congrats on completing your degree! Experience is something that can come in a lot of packages.  Though you may not have held a paid position in your area of interest, have you accumulated skills and experiences through other means?  If not, there may be another way for you to grow your ex...

/ Asked by Nathalie N.
HI there! This is not a one size fits all question.  The answer depends on your job, the immediacy of the question/response and other factors that would impact the decision to respond.

 If you are working in a position that is on a 24 cycle, there is no time that is off limits for sending
...

/ Asked by Nathalie N.
Dress for success!  For future reference, it is always a good idea to ask the recruiter/hiring manager what is specifically meant as casual for their particular environment.  We are all looking to do it right, and a well framed question at the right time can ease the concern.

Though a work
...

/ Asked by Lu M.
Always respond to questions on an application truthfully.  One of the worst moments I had as a recruiter was having to turn someone down for a fraudulent application who was otherwise awesome.  If they had been up front we could have worked with it. 

Know what is on your background ch
...

/ Asked by Nathalie N.
That’s great that your school offers a mentoring program! As far as a location to meet, all those you listed are appropriate. I would consider the length of time it might take to conduct your interview and the time of day when selecting a location. Your interviewee may want a snack, drink, etc...

/ Asked by Nathalie N.
If you had real responsibilities, as you would have in any other job, you should definitely add the job to your resume. You gained valuable work experience that should be counted for and represented on your resume. As far as bringing it up in the interview, yes you should. You don’t have to im...

/ Asked by Tanya L.
Absolutely! You’re asking someone to help you out, so start off on the right foot by inviting them to coffee or lunch and picking up the tab. It’s the least you can do in exchange for sharing their time and knowledge - and potentially even a lead to the career of your dreams.

If they woul
...

/ Asked by Tanya L.
Networking, networking, networking.  That's really the focus at any industry event you attend.  People like having a face to go with a name and that is your chance to make that happen.  When you reach back out to the people you meet to see if they have openings, could do information i...

/ Asked by Tanya L.
You’re not the first person to think networking is a waste of time, but the fact is that professional connections are consistently one of the best ways to land a career. Consider if you’re doing enough of the right things to leave a lasting impression.

As much as you want to gain new know
...

/ Asked by Matthew S.
Congrats on completing your PhD! Looking at consulting roles is a great opportunity, but also consider companies and government agencies that look for candidates with advanced STEM degrees to fill a variety of roles in leadership, finance, technology and more. Many companies - AT&T included - ha...

/ Asked by Kylie M.
Congratulations on graduating!  It is great to recognize how your natural proclivities and education come together for their best impact.  It can take people a long time to figure out what is going to be best for them, so consider yourself a step ahead in the game.  Now how to best us...

/ Asked by Donald G.
Good question!  Have you noticed that many companies have moved to an online application based system for applying?  So they will be collecting your address information when you apply anyway. 

However far it steps away from tradition, I recommend including the contact information that
...

/ Asked by Sam B.
First off, you are thinking smart and that is a good place to kick off salary negotiations.  Do your research and find out what the market rate for the job is.  Be prepared with that information and also what you feel compensates you appropriately for your unique skill set.  It is a c...

/ Asked by David V.
Hi there!  There are a lot of things you can create as part of the creation of your personal brand.  A resume website, a video resume, a traditional resume, a carefully complete LinkedIn Profile, a honed elevator pitch, business cards etc.

Whether or not any of these things are going to be
...

/ Asked by James E.
Congrats on going back to school! If you want to go where the growth is, set your sights on cybersecurity. It’s one of the fastest evolving fields in technology as the Internet of Things comes to life and connects everything from whole homes and vehicles to everyday necessities like healthcare...

/ Asked by Alyss R.
Honesty is always the best policy.  This is a cliche for a reason, because it's true.  In this day and age our world has become small in terms of who may know who and the flow of information so just be prepared to speak to your work history.

Prepare yourself with some great examples of the
...

/ Asked by Harsha K.
Congratulations on completing your degree.  I'd like to offer you some advice that is pertinent across the job spectrum.  Networking and helping people in your industry associate your name with great work can make all the difference when looking for a job.  The low-hanging fruit is Li...

/ Asked by Ngai K.
Hi there! You are not wrong that there can be a pretty specific list of things that recruiter look for in internship candidates.  But what you might be missing on this one is that the degree is just one of the pieces of the puzzle.

Do you have leadership experience?  Did you head up an orga
...

/ Asked by Akash L.
Hi there,

It would be difficult to determine the scope of your job without seeing your job description or employment contract. If it is open ended and not specific to work you would be doing for the on-site client, then there may be no reason to think you wouldn't be asked to take on projects on a la
...

/ Asked by Sam B.
Congratulations!  It is a great adventure to pick up stakes and move your life somewhere new.  There are a couple of factors that truly play a part in being successful in a new job, and finding your spot in a community is one of them.  You'll spend time with your new co-workers, you'l...

/ Asked by Sam B.
Congratulations on your job offer!  That is great news!  When you look through the paperwork, you are looking for written confirmation of all aspects of your offer.  You've got salary covered, so now you need to know what your Insurance is going to cost, what your bonus structure look...

/ Asked by Cameron M.
Congrats on your upcoming graduation! Your first step as an international student looking to work - whether through OPT or other options - is to get in touch with your career services office for foreign students and learn what resources are available for your situation. You don’t mention curre...

/ Asked by Monisha S.
Everyone applying for the same job may say they want to work for the company, so standing out from the crowd is a good thing. Share with the interviewer how long you have admired the company or used their product/service and if you’ve been an ambassador for their product/service. Not only sayi...

/ Asked by Nefer M.
Yes, you can bring up hardships that you have overcome to explain spots on your resume. Discuss what you have learned from your experiences and how it has made you into the awesome person you are today. Let them know that because of these adversities, you are more dedicated, more determined, and mor...

/ Asked by sunny s.
Hi there! The interview is such an interesting time.  You want to make a good impression, you want to get a feel for the organization, but most of all you want to get the job!  I think people can feel compelled to reshape their responses to what they think someone wants to hear, but that m...

/ Asked by chance a.
Hi there!  Great question! AT&T recruiters do not actively search out and review candidates social media pages. However, there may be some employers who do, so having a reputable social presence is something to always strive for.

I like to use the news test...would I be badly represented if
...

/ Asked by chance a.
Many employers want to see a candidate is interested in developing and networking in their craft. While it’s not always a job requirement, a professional membership is a good way to demonstrate that commitment as long as you put it to use. Joining a group like the AMA allows you to grow your c...

/ Asked by Reakisha C.
Hi there!  Just about every company is going to have different steps in their application process, and with such limited information this forum would be hard pressed to answer your question accurately.

But I will say this, make sure to check your email for application updates from the company (j
...

/ Asked by Andrew H.
Hi there!

I know it can be frustrating when you don't hear back.  This is something we have been working on from a bunch of different angles, and I don't think we're alone as a company when it comes with wanting to engage with our candidates in a way that makes sense to both sides of the equatio
...

/ Asked by David V.
Way to hit on an idea that more people should consider!  It can be really easy to engage with the people who are in your immediate circle, but far more challenging to make meaningful connections outside of your team.  Some really solid suggestions have been made by other responders, but I ...

/ Asked by Sam B.
You can start by connecting with local businesses across their social channels and engage with them by expressing your interest in obtaining a career with the respective organization. You should also make sure to follow the businesses on their social channels so that you see jobs they may post. And,...

/ Asked by Jeffrey W.
Hi there!  It's can be really exciting to decide to strike out in a new direction.  It can also be discouraging at times, not to mention anxiety ridden and frustrating.  None of those downsides make it any less worthwhile though.  I for one do not want to get to the end of my lif...

/ Asked by Jessica M.
Yes! Here at AT&T many of our Talent Acquisition team members use LinkedIn as a tool to identify potential employees, connect and share opportunities with them. I also know of several hiring managers that share opportunities with their personal networks on LinkedIn and engage with potential empl...

/ Asked by Sam B.
You are asking some great questions here.  Some of the answers are going to be exclusive to the company you work for and the industry you are pursuing.  For example, if you are an actuary, promotions are sometimes directly attached to passing industry specific leveling tests.  If you ...

/ Asked by David V.
Congratulations on your new job! The first thing you should do is take time to celebrate, but I’m going to assume you’ve already got that covered and expand from there.

First, whatever you don’t know about the company, now would be the time to learn as much more as you can. Hopefull
...

/ Asked by Connor P.
I don't love this question.  As a recruiter, as a candidate, doesn't matter, I just don't know if I truly believe it is a good indicator of how someone deals with their personal challenges or reacts under pressure.  That having been said, it most definitely ends up getting asked more times...

/ Asked by monica w.
Hi there!  A supervisory role can have a number of different facets, and I always look at the "asks" from a company as probably serving more than one purpose.  So putting those things together...they want you to be a supervisor, so you need to be able to express yourself cohesively and a f...

/ Asked by Connor P.
Awesome question! It crosses all industries and is a skill everyone should cultivate. Your elevator pitch is 3 things: 30 seconds. What's your skill? What's your ask?

Now let's break it out. 30 seconds, because that is likely all you need (and have) to make an impression. Attention spans are short, o
...

/ Asked by Laura C.
Hi there!  In reading your question, I've opted to look at it from a couple of different perspectives.  First off, how great that you have someone interested in talking to your further.  It's a key first step to getting in the door to impress with your interview skills.  Second, ...

/ Asked by Kevin P.
Hi there!  The best thing you can do when you are planning major life changes is to get your personal plan as set as it can be and then open the dialog with your employer.  Everyone does better with a thorough understanding of a situation and great communication!

Chances are good that your
...

/ Asked by Connor P.
Awesome question! It crosses all industries and is a skill everyone should cultivate. Your elevator pitch is 3 things: 30 seconds. What's your skill? What's your ask?

Now let's break it out. 30 seconds, because that is likely all you need (and have) to make an impression. Attention spans are short, o
...

/ Asked by Laura C.
Nice work scoring an invitation to interview and attend an Open Day! That means the company you’ve applied to is interested in learning more about you, and in return, wants to give you a closer look at them.

On a typical Open Day, employers bring you in with several other potential candidates t
...

/ Asked by suhaina s.
When is comes to the perfect resume keep in mind there is going to be a difference of opinion depending on who you ask. Perceived perfection is in the eye of the beholder. There is not just one style, format or guide for a resume; you want to stand out but for the right reason.
The key to a great res...

/ Asked by Julie B.
Wow!  Great question!  Effective communication finds its roots in a couple of key ingredients, and not working from that foundation can lead to misunderstanding and inefficiency. 

Get started by making sure you are on the same page with the person you are communicating with.  If
...

/ Asked by Manuel V.
Hello there!  Smart move having another set of eyes check out your resume.  If you don't have anyone who hails from a recruiting background to give you tips, go check out community boards for your fiend of interest.  Or go for the old favorite...networking on LinkedIn! Recruiters are ...

/ Asked by Sal M.
Congratulations!  Graduating is always a good first step.  OK...so you are in a really interesting moment in your career.  Have you checked out any leadership development programs or HR specific internships at companies you might be interested in?  Are you working to connect with...

/ Asked by Debora A.
Hi there!  20 years is no small accomplishment, so congrats on that! It can be really difficult to move to an unfamiliar market, and whenever possible, I typically recommend securing a new position prior to making a big geographical change.  But let's face it, that's not how life always wo...

/ Asked by Laura C.
Hi there!  Some good, insightful responses have been added already, but I wanted to add just a little extra two cents.  It is a truly positive thing for companies to seek out talent in their internal workforce.  As you get further into any recruiting process in fact, you, as a candida...

/ Asked by Carey C.
These are great questions.  But before we jump into that, please know, you are not alone.  You checked the boxes for Career Planning and Job Searching.  Good choices!  Plan the career, make the road map so you know where to reorient yourself if it gets hard. 

Ok, so here's w
...

/ Asked by julie w.
Such a good question!  Here are the questions to ask yourself:

Is your work history incomplete without it?
Do you want to be able to point at skills and experiences you gained in that job?
Was the company you were terminated from one that your goal employer is familiar with?
Is honest the best poli



...

/ Asked by Bobby S.
This is a pretty timely question as we see more and more people participating in online programs.  I think to an extent it is going to depend on the employer, the job and the requirements/expectations of the position.  Online programs hold incredible value!  The provide access to educ...

/ Asked by Kirby A.
Absolutely!  If you have direct contacts who you have had previous live dialog with, you are welcome to reach out to them.  I second the previous responder's use of the word "thoughtful."  Think about the message you are sending and what your goals are when you communicate.

I am a stro
...

/ Asked by mike c.
Hi there!  You are wise to jump right in and ask for help right out of the gate.  Your resume is your introduction to potential employers, educational programs, volunteer opportunities and a slew of other places you may need to share your experience, skills, interests and goals.  You ...

/ Asked by Joaquin R.
You know what...there are some things that are pretty natural in life.  Anxiety/nervousness at an interview is definitely one of them!  Sometimes stress manifests in inconspicuous ways that are easy to hide and sometimes they are right out there in front, like sweating your way through the...

/ Asked by John F.
I commend your desire to support your hometown and look for ways to work towards filling socioeconomic gaps in struggling communities. 

Being an entrepreneur typically means finding a new product, new process, new way of seeing an old problem...you get the idea.  So what are the needs of t
...

/ Asked by Tanya L.
After reading the responses of my fellow recruiters, I wanted to drop a quick note as well.  I think there are some great nuggets of truth here...it is a stretch to say that the jobs you held in high school are still relevant to your post college employer.  That having been said, I could n...

/ Asked by Tanya L.
You know what?  It happens to everyone in some form or fashion!  Take comfort in knowing that you are not alone in trying to figure out how you want to discuss that potentially touchy topic.  Why is it touchy?  Because you probably feel like you have to explain why the company di...

/ Asked by Tanya L.
You've received some good responses here, and I second the statements about GPA being critical to certain positions and programs.  Typically the number a company is looking for as a minimum is listed in the job description or job profiles on their career site. 

It has been my experience th
...

/ Asked by Laura C.
Oh the joys of the telephone interview!  You get to make a first impression, you get to relax in the space of your choosing and you just might do these things while wearing your comfiest pants! Downside, you don't get to wow the interviewer with your amazing facial expressions and stylized gest...

/ Asked by Abiy A.
Ahhhh yes, the old what's your weakness question.  The tried and true method of making an interview temporarily uncomfortable, unless of course you have prepped for it, which you always should.  So good on you for doing your homework.

Being prepared to answer this question should have multi
...

/ Asked by Ivonne G.
High five to you for realizing you need to get in there and find some options to gain experience while you are an undergrad.  Feel free to check out our programs at www.att.jobs/college.  We are looking for a little more time under your belt for some of our internships/development programs...

/ Asked by Laura C.
An interesting question!  So typically I would say LinkedIn is your pathway to networking and job searching, but not the actual job offer.  In most organizations there is a standardized process of application, interview, job offer (or a combination of similar steps).  An actual formal...

/ Asked by Laura C.
Hi there! I think you are asking internship or grad school?  So here's what I think on that one...either or both.  There are many program tracks that might fit the bill for you.  You can check out ours at www.att.jobs/college

That having been said, what I think you will find is
...

/ Asked by Andrea P.
Kudos to you for looking at options that will expand your talents! While a Masters in Computer Science can lead to great opportunities, find out if the work you ultimately want to do requires that level of education. If not, your time and money are much better spent on the second undergrad degree an...

/ Asked by Sandipan B.
Great question and congrats on your pending graduation! With such a specific degree focus you may need to dig a little more, but the awesome news is there are some easy places to start. The fastest is going to be your standard internet search. When I type in "Computational Fluid Dynamics jobs" there...

/ Asked by Alfred M.
   Hello!

It might help you to know you’re not alone. We certainly hear quite a few students struggling with the same decision, and the good news is that internships aren’t the only path.
While an internship can be an important step for gaining experiencing – even requi

...

/ Asked by Jisoo R.
You are incredibly lucky!  Know why?  You are learning one of the most important lessons about...well frankly, LIFE!  You have to communicate, maintain a dialog, keep people in the know, ask questions...and any other way of saying TALK!  The other key is learning the timing of ha...

/ Asked by Saint S.
Hi there!  Sorry to hear the job isn't working out how you'd like.  Now my big question for you...are you talking to your leadership about expectations?  Both yours and theirs?  Suffering in silence is not the way to go when you are building your career.  Respectful and appr...

/ Asked by Andrew H.
Great question! Read job descriptions thoroughly to get a real impression of what the company is looking for! Also, have a look at more than just the position you're interested in, what requirements are expected from a job at the same company that is perhaps the next level up from entry?  Now g...

/ Asked by D. K.
The smart move is to seek out the best candidate for the position.  This may mean internal and external candidates are being considered.  So there is no sure fire way to know that a position will go to an external candidate over an internal candidate.  However, if it posted in a publi...

/ Asked by Chris S.
There is a reason that behavior at company holiday parties is the punch line of so many jokes!  You don't want to be that person, so don't get crazy.  You are still going to be working with these people day in and day out in the new year.  That seems pretty straight forward doesn't it...

/ Asked by Ravindran R.
Excellent end of the year question!  Have you every thought about how incredible it is that the top technology jobs for 2016 were not even invented yet in 2006?  For my money, technology continues to take center stage in areas of growth and salary potential.  As we become even more of...

/ Asked by marcia d.
As you are in recruiting, you know as well as anyone it can be tough to get your details in front of the right set of eyes.  First off, make sure your resume as well as your online profiles represent the work you are truly doing.  If you are doing the work of an operations manager, you sho...

/ Asked by Ethabel K.
Hi there, great question.  My policy is that  you should include the information that is asked for in the Job Description or by the recruiting team.  If GPA is not asked for, you do not need to include it in your initial information offering.  It is likely that you will need to p...

/ Asked by Stephanie E.
Everyone's experience is different!  That is something good to remember in every interaction whether it be in your work or personal life.  Going straight from a scholastic life into a professional life is an adjustment.  In that same line of logic, going from an old job to a new job i...

/ Asked by Bruce L.
Hi there!  Go check out the job descriptions that are posted online for your top five companies.  See what they are asking for.  Then go check out the LinkedIn profiles of the people working for those companies and see what they bring to the table.  While you're there, work on ne...

/ Asked by Nathan H.
All companies are going to have a different set of criteria for their background checks.  Make sure you know all the details of how your charge reads, the dates and the details.  Be honest about it when asked and be sure to be prepared to have a frank conversation. 

As mentioned by a
...

/ Asked by Danh N.
Switching gears and shifting into an area of business you don't have experience in means casting a wide net, being prepared to leverage the experience you do have and networking your way into your field of choice.  In this employment climate, you need to find ways to get your skills, your exper...

/ Asked by Chris S.
Hi there!  Thanks for asking an excellent and very timely question!  More people should be thinking about this very subject at all levels of job searching.  I think the first portion of your question has been answered handily by the other replies, but I wanted to take on the "Should" ...

/ Asked by Chris S.
Your resume is potentially your first introduction to a potential employer, so it is often a good idea to tailor it to your audience.  Having more than one version of your resume is a good exercise in looking at your experience from different angles and how it might appeal to different employer...

/ Asked by carol b.
Hi there!  The suggestions about www.indeed.com and speaking with your school counselors are great.  So I hope you have taken advantage of those resources.

I also wanted to say, if you are thinking about future jobs, good for you for noticing that it is never too early to think about your
...

/ Asked by Robert K.
I could not agree more with the previous poster.  Networking is key in this situation.  They mentioned LinkedIn, information interviewing and utilizing career fairs to make contact with recruiters.  I would also recommend using your university's career center and also professional org...

/ Asked by Arina H.
With an MBA and MS, you have come into contact with potentially lots of people who could assist you with your job search.  At the colleges where you received your degrees, they likely have career centers geared to this exact need, not to mention networking opportunities with professors and peer...

/ Asked by Kasey G.
Your passion, your calling, your aha moment that sets you off on your path to your life?  That's something worth looking for! I have some ideas for how to find it. Try things.  Lots of things.  Things that make you feel stretched and scared, things that are comfortable and cozy, thing...

/ Asked by Natasha J.
Without your specific information it would be tough to tell you exactly what your situation is, but I can tell you with certainty that one of the best ways to find a job that is outside of your exact qualifications is through networking.  Talk to people who work at companies that you are intere...

/ Asked by Devin V.
I always recommend crafting your resume around the job you are applying for.  This can often mean you have different resumes for different positions.  Typically though, this means you adjust objectives or the order and significance placed on certain skills, not removing jobs from your hist...

/ Asked by Luis S.
Hi there - Did the application specifically ask you to note the best days to contact you?  If not, then why add a layer of complication for a recruiter or hiring manager?  Answer the questions being asked of you and make it easy to leave a message via phone or email.  If a recruiter w...

/ Asked by raghu t.
Where did life take you during your year off? What did you learn?  Who did you meet? What did it teach you about your future?  How did the time off impact your perspective?  You get to shape the narrative about that time off, so be prepared.  You can talk about it in your cover l...

/ Asked by Tanya L.
References are an interesting thing!  Who is going to list a reference that would give them a bad review, and yet they are almost always asked for on an application and typically included with a resume package. 

You always want to go with people who are going to actually be able to speak t
...

/ Asked by Maura W.
Twitter is an amazing way to connect and network with prospective employers and professionals within the company and get an inside look to see what it might be like to work there. By utilizing keyword #hashtags you can search for jobs in specific fields, cities or state.

Many companies have specific
...

/ Asked by Tanya L.
That’s a great question! Studies show that as little as 7% of verbal communication actually plays a role in first impressions, so it’s not all about the conversation, but how you present yourself in that short period of time you have to chat. Employers want to see that you can represent ...

/ Asked by Tanya L.
You pose a really good question that not many students consider when starting out. Passion is definitely important, but you’ll have to identify if your passion translates to helping you achieve your future goals. Companies want to see that you’re a well-rounded individual capable of perf...

/ Asked by Tanya L.
It really is a great time in your life to set out on an adventure and see what's out there, so congrats on the graduation and the travel.  Here's the thing, there is no reason you can't lay some good networking groundwork before you take off for your trip.  Connect with people in your fiel...

/ Asked by Tanya L.
Ever heard the expression “the early bird gets the worm”?. It holds true for up-and-coming college grads now more than ever.

In general, companies start recruiting college students heavily in the Fall, looking for students ready to join the workforce as soon as they graduate. If you&rsquo
...

/ Asked by T G.
The more you know, the better equipped you will be when the time is right for you to launch your career.  Be up front with employers and let them know that you realize you might be ineligible for their current open positions, but you take your networking and your future seriously.  Talk ab...

/ Asked by Robert Z.
Congratulations on taking time to focus on your future. A gap in work history doesn't have to be a bad thing as long as you can demonstrate how you spent your time working towards your goals.

Focus on the positives - the education you were pursuing, any community organizations you stayed involved wit
...

/ Asked by Claudia J.
My opinion of video resumes is that it is one more tool in your belt that just might set you apart from the rest of the applicants.  Now here's the thing, many application systems are not set up to take that type of file or require that you submit a "paper" record to be parsed into a data colle...

/ Asked by Tanya L.
Hi there!  GPA requirements are truly a case by case requirement.  Almost always, if there is a specific number that has to be hit, it will be there in black and white in the job description.  Now, I would say it is going to depend on what the extracurriculars were, the role you playe...

/ Asked by Tanya L.
Hi there! Study abroad experiences can be a truly amazing part of your educational journey.  You listed some good things in your question, but maybe another way to think about it is how does the experience apply to your leadership experience, organizational skills, development of process flows ...

/ Asked by Maura W.
If you are looking for a job I like the idea that it is best to search early and often.  Now keep in mind that searching, applying, interviewing and hiring are all elements of the process that take different amounts of time and engagement.

A position that requires less overall experience, educa
...

/ Asked by Tanya L.
Great question! No one can deny that social media has become an important part of our culture and the way we communicate with and get to know each other. When setting up your social media profiles, use professional photos (no selfies) that are current, positive (smile) and represent you. And, make s...

/ Asked by Mia M.
Unglamorous work experience still has the opportunity to give you crucial skills that you need later on down the road, it's all a matter of identifying it. In fact, there are countless examples of successful people who held unflattering jobs. What most of them will tell you is they learned something...

/ Asked by Fernanda D.
If you were a minor when the incident occurred, there is a chance your record is sealed but that is up to the judge. When companies run background checks typically, the standard is to go back 7 years to see if you have any criminal records in all the counties you’ve lived, worked and went to s...

/ Asked by Rosemary K.
Hello, and thanks for putting voice to a question that comes up a lot!

Before diving in, it’s important to note that more and more companies now have policies that discourage, or even prevent, managers from providing letters of recommendation for various reasons. Other managers may simply not f
...

/ Asked by Tanya L.
Practice, Practice, Practice. Start with a trusted friend, family member, colleague etc. Help them help you by printing out some softball interview questions to help you work up to a level of comfort in speaking about yourself, your accomplishments, your experience and your innovations.

If you go ba
...

/ Asked by Kate M.
When your work experience is a little on the lighter side, it can be a really good idea to think about some non-traditional ways to demonstrate your leadership, problem-solving and strategic thinking skills.  Have you been the head of any groups? Ever organize an event? Did you come up with inn...

/ Asked by Christine C.
I always wanted to be a voice over actor.  Voice a cartoon, be the person who speaks really quickly at the end of commercials to get the legalese in, voice online trainings, doesn't really matter what the work is as long as it is voice over work.  I've done a little here and there for my c...

/ Asked by Jennifer W.
Transitioning jobs!  Great topic!  Anytime you are looking to make a move, it pays to make a contact.  Someone in a role you are interested in within your own company, or in the field you want to be in outside of your company.  Networking and information interviewing serve a coup...

/ Asked by Eric W.
A great question, and one that has received some solid answers from the previous responders.  I agree completely that there are advocacy groups, community organizations, both public and private foundations and a wide variety of online and person to person groups with the important and impactful...

/ Asked by Rachel D.
That's a great question and one that is probably on the minds of just about every person you know!  First off, you are smart to recognize that salary, raises and compensation packages as a whole vary from company to company.  One of the things that I consider really important to gauging yo...

/ Asked by Hui-hua W.
Your question is a great one with a really simple answer: experience. Yes, skills are important, but even more important is your demonstrated experience learning, using and honing those skills that employers want to see most - especially for a leadership role. For a student, experience comes from a ...

/ Asked by David V.
This is such a great inquiry that i wanted to ask around a little bit and collect the thoughts of a couple of my peers and pals.

"Ask peers and your management team if you can join their meetings when you first start a new role even if you are not a part of that project. It will allow you to see how
...

/ Asked by travis g.
Thank you for your 10 years of military service! It’s great that you are transitioning with a skillset that is recognized in the civilian sector. Depending on the type of electronics you were working on, the equipment might be a little different but you have a strong foundation of fundamentals...

/ Asked by Joe D.
Congrats on the interview, it is a tough job market out there!  When it comes right down to it, if the organization you interviewed with did not feel your skills were of interest, they would likely not have mentioned the alternative position.  We are living in a fast paced world and there ...

/ Asked by Vinesh M.
The pursuit of work/life balance is a hot ticket conversation across just about every business in our modern world.  How do we find a way to make it all work, building our careers while maintaining our relationships and the important bonds that are such a big part of fitting all the pieces toge...

/ Asked by Joe W.
Social strategies are hot, hot, hot parts of branding and marketing plans across industries world-wide.  A savvy user of social media tools with an established personal brand can be GOLD to a company without a strong social presence.  All areas from employment branding and candidate engage...

/ Asked by Poornima B.
You have nailed a great big dilemma right on the head! How do I combine my social passions with my professional pursuits?  Here's my question to you...are there organizations that are trying to harness these two areas already?  I think you may need a multi-prong approach here.  Talk t...

/ Asked by Kayla G.
Great question!  I think some terrific advice has been offered by the companies who have responded.  Internships! Networking! Masters Degree! You are in a really unique position at this stage of your career, not so far into something that you can't change course, but with some experience s...

/ Asked by Rachel D.
Trends in business change quickly, but one sure constant is that networking is a key ingredient to success.  LinkedIn is great, it makes for fast contact and easy research.  A robust profile with key search terms brings industry insiders and recruiters alike knocking at your electronic doo...

/ Asked by Rachel D.
Information Interview, Information Interview, Information Interview!  Great advice has come from other responders about finding your passion and going after it!  Once you have your lists, have your goals, have your narrowed down ideas you need to network in the chosen industries/companies ...

/ Asked by Kumar A.
Every point of contact is critical.  You are building an impression, building your personal brand and building your future with an organization.  In truth that phone interview is the gateway to next steps, a poor impression there does not lead to a face to face interview.  Knock my so...

/ Asked by Christian K.
Hello! It sounds like you’ve been going to school and working at the same time, which certainly demonstrates a level of commitment to your goals, so you would be doing yourself a disservice by tossing out any work experience you’ve gained along the way. True, you’re not going to be...

/ Asked by Tydie A.
One of the most incredible things about having an internship is that it is entirely about learning things.  Learning the business, learning the culture, learning about yourself and last (but by far) not least, learning how to communicate.  This sounds like a terrific opportunity to stretch...

/ Asked by Jessica B.
Interviewing is an art!  It can take time to develop a good feel for how to present yourself as the best candidate for the job.  And to tell you the truth part of learning the art of interviewing includes knowing when a job isn't for you after some discussion and a deeper dive into what th...

/ Asked by Brittani T.
Way to go! Finishing your degree and working at the same time can make for a heavy load, so congratulations on your accomplishment!

I like to think about the fact that just about everything I've done from the menial tasks to the head scratching innovations has been preparing me for my next step. It h
...

/ Asked by Tomi H.
This is a great question, and it is one that people should perhaps ask themselves throughout their careers.  Other responders to your question have already spent time talking about aptitude tests and following what makes you happy.  I don't disagree, but I do think there is more to conside...

/ Asked by Francis D.
While official statistics on paid vs unpaid internships are hard to come by, the general consensus these days is around 50% of internships are paid positions, and that number may be growing for a number of reasons that benefit both employers and interns.

Glassdoor.com and payscale.com are two sites t
...

/ Asked by Charity B.
Think about what details you want to stand out to the person that sees your resume. What will land you the job? Is it your recent degree, courses and projects you did in class? Is it your work experience, the internship that puts you in a perfect position to apply for this job? Is it your volunteer ...

/ Asked by David V.
Being an active member of a networking community can make a huge difference in your career, not just in advancing, but also in keeping your finger on the pulse of the latest happenings in your field, meeting people who have similar interests and sharing your own expertise with people equally interes...

/ Asked by ebun o.
I think you are touching on more than one great career related idea with this question!  So first of all, you don't always know exactly what a job will look like once you're in it, so when you pick the job offer to accept you are using the information you have at that moment to make the best de...

/ Asked by Sarah L.
When I think about my own career search and how my resume, experience, special skills and interests stack up against a similarly qualified candidate, I give a lot of thought to the question...what is going to set me apart?  This is something a busy recruiter is also thinking about when they are...

/ Asked by hope m.
It can be incredibly exciting to think about transitioning from one career to another. You are fortunate to be in a field that is highly transferable to other industries. Communication, time management, efficient use of resources, budgeting and familiarity with common and emerging technologies are j...

/ Asked by Michael B.
The major job boards can be a great starting point for your job search at any stage in a career, but recent grads may find sites like CareerRookie.com and Experience.com to have more opportunities that cater to their goals. Both of these sites focus on entry-level opportunities available to college ...

/ Asked by Sam B.
Every employer is different and it depends on the nature of the role. Some types of jobs in some states have to be given routine breaks by law. If you’re talking about a professional job in an office environment then breaks can be looked upon as being critical to optimum productivity, as long ...

/ Asked by David V.
An interviewer can’t know that you’re the right candidate in 15 seconds, however he or she could feel like they know you’re *not* the right candidate in that amount of time. Meaning, it’s easy to blow it early on by dressing inappropriately, being late, not being prepared wit...

/ Asked by Lyra M.
The honest truth is that it is very important to do well in the formal interview. Does it have to be flawless? Do you have to absolutely knock the interviewer’s socks off? Not necessarily, and it likely depends on the level of competition for that particular job. But it is important for the in...

/ Asked by Latricia C.
Some employers may be reluctant to hiring individuals with a disability for a couple of reasons:

Some may feel that the accommodations the employee will ask for will be expensive. They may think that because of the disability, the employee may ask for additional time off. They may be mis-in
...

/ Asked by Erica M.
Since your resume won’t contain a traditional chronological work history with all gaps filled in, you’ll want to carefully craft experiences to address specific skillsets listed as requirements for the jobs to which you are applying. Perhaps there’s something you’ve done in a...

/ Asked by ian t.
Everybody who likes baseball wants to work for a baseball organization – but it’s not all Moneyball and these entry level positions are highly sought after because of the industry. Take a look at the Major League Baseball Careers page, then look at your local major and minor league team ...

/ Asked by Manasi D.
Sponsorship absolutely does happen at many companies, including large ones. Because there are costs incurred to sponsor an international candidate, some companies are selective in choosing which jobs to sponsor. Jobs with a large pool of US candidates may not be open for sponsorship, while jobs with...

/ Asked by Mike M.
Practice, practice, practice! As uncomfortable as it can be to play “mock interview” with a friend, family member, or colleague, it’s really the best way to get over the jitters. Even better, find a professional mentor working in the field for which you are interviewing and perform...

/ Asked by Alina C.
Go expecting nothing to be given to you and fully expecting that you will make the most of the opportunity. You have a great advantage that you may have the ability to gather insights on those individuals you are meeting - unlike many career fairs. Prepare good questions, plan to engage each of...

/ Asked by Cassandra V.
When companies post an opening you can assume they are looking to fill the position within weeks of the job advertisement. If you’re ready to jump into the job market and work full time while finishing up school in the evenings then yes, absolutely start applying now. You may find some resista...

/ Asked by Lorena C.
If you’re applying for a sports or athletic position of some sort and you don’t have other athletic work experience to reference then yes, absolutely. If you’re applying for a position in a field other than sports/athletics then it’s probably best to leave this off of the res...

/ Asked by Andrew H.
Consider how the responsibilities you held working for family relate to the jobs for which you’re applying. Focus on your accomplishments and the goals that you attained and demonstrate how you can apply those skills in a new environment. Even if you didn’t have an official job descripti...

/ Asked by Jimmy A.
If nothing comes up that’s a good thing! It’s much harder to compete with someone with a similar name who already has a strong online presence. The best way to build a professional online presence is to have an active account on professional networking sites like LinkedIn. Profiles on pr...

/ Asked by Randy D.
Employment testing (e.g., personality inventories, skills test, simulations, etc.) are a recommended best practice in the hiring process. Research has shown that these types of tests provide accurate measures of people’s skills and abilities and, therefore, we (at AT&T) use tests to identi...

/ Asked by Michael G.
Having a well rounded online presence can be an added benefit to you in your job search. Many recruiters use social media as an avenue to search for individuals with the relevent skills and experience for their open position(s). There are numerous online communities and groups fo...

/ Asked by Jacob S.
You are correct, the Military isn’t a corporation but it is run very similar to a business. It’s important to remember that your military training is your experience and what might set you aside from other candidates. Make a list of all your leadership training, transfer any roles that y...

/ Asked by Luis G.
There is no single best way to format a resume. I saw one game developer’s resume go viral online because he turned his resume into an online interactive game. Hiring managers used their keyboard arrow keys to guide an avatar around the screen to explore the developer’s qualifications an...

/ Asked by Nicole S.
It’s tough to plan a job search from a distance but there’s quite a bit of research you can do online as part of your preparations. Start researching companies and career opportunities in your industry at your destination location. LinkedIn is a great resource and you can also check site...

/ Asked by Julie B.
It’s a good question and one that many stay-at-home moms and dads have when returning to the work force. Although as a parent you’re exhibiting leadership, morale-boosting, change management, financial stewardship, and teamwork (now that I think about it, seemingly enough to land any res...

/ Asked by Jill S.
Did you volunteer during this time? Raise children? Obtain certifications or other education? Your goal will be to highlight for hiring managers how you continued to remain an active, productive problem-solver during your periods of unemployment. In what ways did you add value to an organization, gr...

/ Asked by Paul D.
If you have the contact information for the recruiter or even the hiring manager then a single, brief, professionally-crafted email reinforcing your interest and qualifications for the position is appropriate. This would function much like a cover letter. However resist the urge to ask for an update...

/ Asked by Jonathan L.
The job interview is the one setting in which it is professionally understood that you will be talking well of yourself. However, a couple points will make sure you sound experienced, mature, and professional. First, use the word “we” as often as you use the word “I.” For exa...

/ Asked by Michael H.
Congratulations on the successful interview. A common question applicants ask at the end of the interview is about the employer’s timeframe for next steps. If you asked that then let the answer dictate how soon you follow up. If the employer said they intend to have a decision in a week (or tw...

/ Asked by Jonathan L.
Make sure you take advantage of LinkedIn’s tips and tools in order to make your profile shine. You can access free live and recorded training offered by LinkedIn’s experts at this link. Make sure you upload a professional photo and add your “elevator pitch” to the summary sec...

/ Asked by Margaret B.
Regarding recommendations for “someone your age,” since Federal EEO laws make it illegal to discriminate due to age, the advice really mirrors that for others in earlier stages of their career: study whatever you can about the position in order to demonstrate your ability to exceed the e...

/ Asked by Chelsey C.
Good question and  I have a simple answer for you - network, network and when you are done, network some more!  Now, I'm being something silly in that response, but the simple truth is that at the core of every good job search is networking.  Reach out and work through the placement o...

/ Asked by August R.
Hi there and congratulations! Graduating from college is a big accomplishment and a great start to kicking off your professional career. I also tip my hat to you that you are taking proactive steps to prepare yourself for what lies ahead. You have invested all this time in your education and you wil...

/ Asked by Patrick H.
It’s a great question, and it’s understandable if it seems similar to booking travel and feeling like you have to search 5 different travel sites to get what you’re looking for. Fortunately for job seekers, though, many companies have systems in place that automatically post every ...

/ Asked by aley w.
Many prospective employers will ask about previous challenges and/or situations where things didn't go as you planned.  This might be issues with a co-worker or a project/task that didn't initially succeed.  They will want you to briefly explain the situation and how you addressed it, as w...

/ Asked by Jonathan L.
Good question!  As long as your skills and experience align with the requirements of the position, it is absolutely appropriate for you to apply to any openings of interest.  Bottom line?  A recruiter or hiring manager is always appreciative of qualified appli...

/ Asked by Jonathan L.
While it is typically optional, it is best to not leave any area(s) blank within the application.  A cover letter provides you an opportunity to speak directly to the position and correlate your skills and qualifications to the needs of the business. Share experience(s) related t...

/ Asked by Laura M.
Prospective employers can gather a lot of information about a person from an interview, but the most important is going to be what you share verbally regarding your experience and qualifications. Companies are interested in what you’ve done in previous jobs or in school. They want to hear abou...

/ Asked by Chad S.
Large companies often receive large quantities of applicants. Chances are, these applications are being filtered by a software program before it reaches a real person. Your best bet is to ensure that you include keywords from the job description in your resume – of course, if you can back it u...

/ Asked by Sarah L.
It isn't unusual for some college students to struggle the first year and you should take pride in turning this around.  Most companies are going to look at your overall GPA and while they may ask for a transcript, they typically don't look year to year and shouldn't hold a poor first year...

/ Asked by Stephanie M.
Excellent question! Hiring Manager absolutely works within a cover letter, but the important thing is to ensure that the letter itself doesn't feel generic. Focus more on the content and include specifics regarding the company and position to demonstrate your level of knowledge and interest.  B...

/ Asked by Steph B.
Congratulations!  It is entirely up to you when you wish to tell your employer and your co-workers your good news.  There are not any set guidelines or even recommendations as it can vary from person to person depending on personal circumstance.  When you are comfortable and ...

/ Asked by Maz J.
Many companies offer flexible schedules and/or telecommuting arrangements. Typically, these organizations have guidelines surrounding eligibility which consider factors, such as; type of work, location, etc. These factors are typically not limited to, and may not even include tenure or level.
Resea...

/ Asked by Mike D.
Great question!  It is always a good idea to gain additional knowledge and experience through internships.  Being an intern with a reputable organization offers the opportunity to gain applicable experience which can set you apart from other candidates in your post school job search.&...

/ Asked by siobhan k.
Companies are, in fact, required to provide equal pay to male and female employees. In fact, President Obama passed groundbreaking equal pay legislation, entitled the Lily Ledbetter Fair Pay Act when he entered office in January 2009. However, in reality, research shows that women only receive $0.77...

/ Asked by John S.
Don't concern yourself too much over this as I don't see it as more than an hiccup in what appears to be an otherwise commendable scholastic record.  You demonstrated true commitment by retaking the course and working to achieve greater than just a passing grade.  If the question aris...

/ Asked by Sarah B.
In many cases, recruiters and hiring managers need your help in drawing the connection between the courses and activities you participated in throughout school to the skills being sought in the position you're applying for. Through your cover letter and resume you will need ...

/ Asked by Arash R.
Many US employers do not sponsor work visas for candidates who aren’t already authorized to work for any employer in the U.S. If you are a US citizen or permanent resident, I recommend that you indicate this prominently on your resume to dispel any assumptions that employers may make if they s...

/ Asked by Anthony A.
This is a great question.  Most likely the Internship route, which can prepare and even assist many in their transition from school to the workplace, was encouraged through your degree program.  Also, entry level or contract positions often make sense for those just sta...

/ Asked by Tanya L.
As much as I love a good note, the timeline to get  the note in the hands of the right person is long.  Go the efficient route and send an email!  It will be equally appreciated and get your name in front of the recruiter one more time.

Best of luck!

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