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Asked by LaShaina on June 13, 2017

I'm a recent electrical engineering graduate and I'm looking for my first job. There are so many titles and locations. How can I figure out the best job to apply for, and my chances of landing a good job?

Answered by Ellee, Hiring Expert at Textron Inc., on June 14, 2017

Hello! When searching for a job, it can be challenging to narrow down jobs that are the right fit. One thing I would recommend doing from the beginning is identify the locations you are interested in living/working. This will allow you to search for open jobs in a particular area. There are several search engines available – Indeed, LinkedIn, and Glassdoor – just to name a few, where you can search for jobs based on title and location. You may also want to use your network and reach out to some of your classmates that may already be working full time in electrical engineering and see what companies they are working for, what role they are in, etc. To be sure you are finding the right fit for you, you will want to review job descriptions instead of applying for a job just based on the job title. Reviewing the job description will allow you to compare your experiences with the job responsibilities and qualifications and to understand if you would be interested in the role. Figuring out “the best job to apply for” will be based on your preferences, qualifications, and the area you want to work and the company you want to work for!

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Answered by James, Hiring Expert at Broadridge, on June 15, 2017

Congrats on your recent graduation! The first step I would recommend is to determine which area you have a passion for in your degree realm. As the previous post stated, it's important to narrow down your geographic location preference. This will help you research companies in that area offering EE roles. With an EE degree, you could look into entry level roles in computer engineering, analytical roles, materials engineering or junior electrical engineering technicians.

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Answered by Stephanie, Hiring Expert at AT&T Inc., on June 20, 2017

Hi there!  You have received some great information from previous responders, but I wanted to add a little extra info around networking.  You are going to find that there are different titles used for the same jobs all over the industry.  It can make it a challenge to narrow your searches and get down to the spot you will be a good fit and legitimately have a shot at getting the interview and the job.  Who better than people who are already in those roles or who supervise those roles to help you better understand what the titles mean and how best to approach getting the job.  How do you network?

You are fresh out of school!  Max out those contacts.  Connect with your professors and peers on LinkedIn now while you are still fresh in their minds.  Go to events where people in your field will be and connect.  Don't ever be afraid to have a conversation about what you want and why you are ready to take the leap.  Whether that means coming up with a 30 second elevator pitch or keeping your online profiles top notch (or both) now is the time!

Best of luck!

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Answered by Tony, Hiring Expert at Hill-Rom, on June 21, 2017

Hello and congratulations! It appears you have received some great feedback on this question from previous employers below and I wanted to add a little more advice for you. In regards to location, on some applications or even job boards you can check whether you are open for relocation or you can even check certain states/cities you are open to relocating to. I would highly recommend doing these so recruiters are aware that you are open to relocation even though you may not be in the current area they are hiring for. Even though this is time consuming, when applying for jobs make sure you are taking the time to consider each job description because as some have already alluded to companies have different titles for potentially the same type of job. Search for job descriptions that match what you’re interested in and what your concentration was in school to help you differentiate yourself from other applicants. If you can match your skills on your resume to some of the requirements of the job description this will increase your chances of a recruiter reaching out to discuss the position further. Hope this helps and best of luck!

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