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General Job Searching Tips and Insight

Get to know your coworkers

There are a couple of factors that truly play a part in being successful in a new job, and finding your spot in a community is one of them. You'll spend time with your new co-workers, you'll become a part of the culture of your office environment, but what about when you head home for the day? Seeking out people with similar interests is a great first step. Do you like to hike, bike, crossfit? There are easy ways to get involved in athletic pursuits. Do you like to read, make music, see a show? There are excellent ways to seek out cultural pursuits.

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Break it down into smaller pieces

Make this easier for yourself and break it down into smaller pieces. Monetary compensation (salary, bonuses, etc.), major benefits (health, vision, dental, time off, etc.) and fringe benefits (stock options, employee purchase perks, discounts, etc). What you want to be looking for in all of these areas is surprisingly simple - what do you require to satisfy your needs? For example, when it comes to health, vision, and dental plans, what do you need? Review the plan or plans offered and dig down into them to find what plans are offers, what the costs are, what they cover, and choose the one that is right for you. If you don’t wear glasses or contacts and rarely, if ever, have gone to the eye doctor, you most likely don’t need vision coverage, or at least not a very robust plan. What is right for each person when reviewing an offer is completely different, but don’t hesitate to review with a friend or family member!

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Be patient

Every company has a different process for applications and status of a candidate. I would not be able to tell you what it means but I would recommend reaching out to your recruiter or point of contact to let them know you are still interested in the position and if they had an update on the status of your application.

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Keep in mind total compensation

Negotiating salary depends on a great deal of factors. My advice is this. Keep in mind total compensation. These are the tangible and intangible factors beside money that contribute to your experience working at the company. For instance, free gym access, flexible scheduling, advancement opportunities, company stability and others are all reasons to consider. Understand that salary alone is typically not what keeps employees engaged in their jobs. I know many leaders who have actually taken a step down in an organization to get the right experience under their belt because it will pay off in the long run.

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Always good to include a cover letter

It's always good to include one. It gives you the chance to explain further why your the ideal candidate for the position. There are many articles about writing a great cover letter with tips and tricks. I would recommend reviewing some before writing one. If they don't specifically ask for one, it is not required of you to include one, but it wouldn't hurt to include a well written one.

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It's never too early to start looking for a job

The sooner you can start building your experience the better. Whether it is internships, volunteer activities or even a paid job (win-win), you want to show that you are maximizing your time during college and learning skills that will make you productive on the first day of your new job post-graduation.

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Be cautious of websites that don't focus entirely on job searching

I highly recommend utilizing all of the tools and resources available to network and locate that great first job. Do be cautious with web-sites that don't necessarily focus on job searching as the quality assurance may not be as strong, however don't discount any avenue as a source for leads.

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Network as much as possible

[N]etwork, network and when you are done, network some more! Now, I'm being silly in that response, but the simple truth is that at the core of every good job search is networking.

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Don't get discouraged if your job hunt is taking a long time

[A] job search can take several months. It is important to remain persistent and patient, while remaining proactive in your search.

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An internship is a great first step to gaining employment

Many companies only target rising seniors for summer internships, but they also want the rising seniors who have some experience!

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Read job searching and career planning books

I do suggest picking it up. It's called, "Getting from College to Career" written by Lindsey Pollak. Lindsey is a next generation career expert and LinkedIn spokesperson. She is very credible and you won't regret picking this book up.

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If you are pregnant and job searching, it's not relevant to notify the employer

You do not have to disclose that you are pregnant. If this is a great job then I would continue to stay in the search.

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It's reasonable to notify the hiring manager you're pregnant during the negotiation process

[I]t is reasonable for you to share your pregnancy news during the negotiation process because it will be transparent in the near future - this will head off any potential perception of you not being upfront with them.

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