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Good Questions to Ask Your Interviewer

Ask about employee satisfaction

Ask peripheral questions that may speak to what makes a workforce happy in general. Many companies understand that employee engagement ranks high on their priority list when it comes to employment satisfaction, why not ask questions surrounding that? I have listed a few examples below:

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Remember these basic questions

What are the day to day responsibilities for this position? What are the expectations for this position? What is the culture of the company? Where do you think the company is headed in the next 5-10 years? What do you like best about working for this company? What are the next steps in the interview process? When do you expect to have a decision for this position? What is the career path for this position?

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Understand What's Important To You

Understand what's important to you. Some people like to have flexibility in hours or work locations that would be something to know about the company. Others may want to know the team dynamics, if they volunteer together, have social events, do the office mates plan to hang out after work or are they 8-5'ers.

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Ask about their personal career path

it's good to know the career path of the person you are interviewing, it will show the trends of career growth and ask what the deciding factor to take that position was. An even better question would be to know what roles they were offered and didn't take and why. This will allow to understand the manger/colleagues on a personal level to know if they are the right fit for you!

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Use this as an opportunity to address yourself

You have most likely done your homework and have questions ready about the role you are interviewing for, but at the end of your interview it’s a great idea to determine fit. “What do you/did you see in my background that you think makes me a fit for this position?”, is a great question to ask that allows you to reiterate and expand upon why you are a great fit, especially given some of the new details you have gained from the interview you can now tie them to.

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Ask about employee satisfaction

Many companies do annual or semi-annual employee surveys. You could ask them if they conduct such surveys and then ask about the areas where the employees report being the most satisfied, as well as the least. Then you could follow up with how the company approaches sustaining the positive aspects of the culture as well as focuses on improvement in other areas.

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  • Please explain the company’s culture – what are the pros and cons?
  • What made you choose to work for the company?
  • What does the typical career path look like for someone entering this role?

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How does your company recognize and reward talent in terms of career progression?

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  • What is the biggest problem that the person in this role will be asked to solve?
  • If I were in this role, how could I make a real impact on profits, productivity?
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  • What are the things that you know now that you wish you had known when you were in my shoes?
  • What are the things that will most help me be successful in this position?
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  • Can you give me some examples of the most and least desirable aspects of the company’s culture?
  • I understand the attraction to [the company], but what have you experienced that makes you stay?
  • How will you judge my success? What will have happened six months from now that will demonstrate that I have met your expectations?
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How do the company core values of X,Y,Z, relate to the work that I will be doing as an Analyst?

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Also consider these insights when putting together questions for your interviewer

Questions that impress me the most are about culture (what's it like here), innovation (how do we develop our competitive edge), and action-oriented (what will I be expected to do within the first 90 days).

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Also consider these insights when putting together questions for your interviewer

I always like a question that is prompted by a recent article they read or a challenge they might see in taking on this opportunity.

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Also consider these insights when putting together questions for your interviewer

How many questions did you prepare for your previous interviews? My recommendation is to come up with three times that amount.

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Also consider these insights when putting together questions for your interviewer

[M]ention something you read online. Did they recently win an award for something? Were they mentioned in an article about anything? You need to find a way to tie in the fact that you came prepared and that you did your “homework” with everything that has been shared during your interview.

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Show you’re actively listening and ask a question related to the interview

If any questions pop up during the interview, write them down so that you don’t forget during the course of the interview.

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