Download our free Resume Ebook

Question you’ll likely be asked

Most questions are behavioral based

Most questions asked are behavioral based questions and they are about you. So definitely pull from your experiences from both work and school to be able to effectively answer the questions.

View entire response >>

Prepare for tehse questions, but don't be rehearsed

It’s always important to be prepared for an interview, but you never want to seem “rehearsed.” Each employer will have their own unique questions, as well as a few “generic” questions. Be prepared to answer questions like “What interested you in this position?, “ What qualifications do you think make you uniquely qualified?,” “Tell me about a time you helped your team complete a difficult task.,” and last but not least, “Do you have any questions for me?”

View entire response >>

Focus on the Who, What, Where, How and Why

At a high level, the questions in your first interview focused on the who, what, and where. In the second interview, they will focus more on the how and why. Also, the higher the level of employee you speak with, the questions will likely be less specific your experiences, and more about you as a person and how you fit with the culture of the company and the expectations of their leaders.

View entire response >>

Be prepared to think out of the box

Occasionally, employers ask more "out of the box" questions like the one you experienced. Possible reasons for asking questions like this are (1) to learn how you go about dissecting a problem/issue in order to resolve it, (2) to assess your creativity, or (3) to see how you adapt to an awkward or unique situation.

View entire response >>

Be familiar with the skills needed for the job

This answer could go on forever, but here is a generalization - Questions directly related to the skills need to do the job, motivational fit, past job history, behavioral based, relocation, salary, bonus, etc.

View entire response >>

You would most always be asked, "Why are in interested in our company/role?"

View entire response >>

"Are there any questions you have for me?" This is probably one of the most important questions during the interview process.

View entire response >>

What has been your most significant professional accomplishment thus in your career?

View entire response >>

Most employers use behavior based interviews, which rely mainly on questions that allow you to share specific experiences demonstrating competencies that fit the position.

View entire response >>

What would you say is your greatest professional accomplishment to date?

View entire response >>

  • General questions:
  • Tell me about yourself?
  • Walk me through your resume, and tell me about each position/educational experience?
  • What hobbies do you enjoy?
  • In the work place what stresses you out the most?
  • What are you most proud of in your career so far?
  • Wacky Questions:
  • If you could be any Disney character, who would you be and why?
  • How many snow shovels sold in the US last year?
  • What is the funniest thing that has happened to you recently?
  • How does the internet work?
  • If you were a pizza deliveryman how would you benefit from scissors?

View entire response >>

A common question applicants ask at the end of the interview is about the employer’s timeframe for next steps. If you asked that then let the answer dictate how soon you follow up.

View entire response >>

Think about your answers

If a question throws you off a bit during the interview, there is nothing wrong with taking a bit of a pause and deep breath to help you refocus during the interview.

View entire response >>

Prepare responses to questions you can anticipate (like the ones above)

Practice answering these questions ahead of your interview and you will be better prepared. Keep in mind, employers are looking for candidates with strong leadership skills, so any chance that you have to draw upon that when answering questions, will be to your benefit.

View entire response >>