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Setting expectations

Find a healthy balance

Most companies deeply value a healthy work/life balance and these are companies that are generally the most successful and have the most engaged and productive employees. Go out to GlassDoor and do some searching on this topic to see what those companies might be. Then begin your efforts to seek out a career opportunity there.

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Ask someone for an explanation of expectations

I have always thought that you have to manage work life balance for yourself. I would get with your manager &/or HR to gain a clear explanation of what is expected (hours, making yourself accessible, etc) of this role. If you are comfortable with those expectations, then it is up to you to balance work:life. (If you aren't comfortable with those expectations, you might want to start working your network to identify other opportunities.)

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Speak with your manager

Most companies have a mid-year and annual review time so that your manager can discuss how you are doing and what areas you can work on developing, based on your career goals. Take that time to communicate openly with your manager, so that you are both on the same page with realistic expectations.

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Make the most of the opportunity

Go expecting nothing to be given to you and fully expecting that you will make the most of the opportunity. You have a great advantage that you may have the ability to gather insights on those individuals you are meeting - unlike many career fairs. Prepare good questions, plan to engage each of them both personally and professionally and understand their line of business. You can research their organizations, open positions, and decide if you are going to use the time to learn more about their profession, gather professional advice, or attempt to make inroads as a potential candidate for the organization.

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Do your homework

First of all, do your homework. If you can find out where they work or what industry they are in, you should do a ton of research on that company and/or industry (if available, read annual financial report). Visit the company website and see if there are any opportunities that match your interests and you are qualified based on the required qualifications for the role. If you see any of interest, apply to them and bring the details of the role to the meeting. I would not recommend leading into your conversation that you have applied to positions though.

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Finding a job is going to take time

[A] typical time-to-fill goal for a position is 45 days from the time the job is posted to when the selected candidate starts on the job. This typically means 2-3 weeks to review candidates, 2 weeks to interview, and another 2 weeks for the selected candidate to give notice and start.

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Apply to a lot of positions

Be sure to apply to 30 jobs a day. I know that seems like a lot, but it is the volume that you will need in order to be getting interviews and then hired.

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Use your personal network

More than 30% of positions are filled by networking - not by perusing job boards.

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Internships are great opportunities to earn a permanent job

A lot of companies hire/interview right out of their intern group for full-time entry level employment.

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A willingness to relocate can increase your opportunities and chances to find a job

Many students are faced with picking up and moving to where the jobs are. Employers tend to view students who have the positive mindset as most impressive. The more open you are to relocation, the more developed you will become as a professional and therefore more attractive to an employer.

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Establish a relationship with a hiring manager

While applying for full-time jobs as a junior may be slightly premature (but certainly go after internship or part-time experience), you should begin networking with hiring managers and/or recruiters at the companies you aspire to work for post-undergrad.

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The first round of an interview is as critical as any round

I would say about 40% we hire from the first round of interviews.

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